Main Index to Examples of Instructional Software for Symbolic Logic

5/5/2015

Javascript, Java, etc.

In the period from about 2000-2010, most of this software was written in Java and was running either as Java Applets within web browsers or as stand alone applications. Time and context change, though. As of 2013, there are 3 billion installations that run Java. Unfortunately, this widespread use, and apparent ideal universality, has attracted miscreants (and also applet delivery and launch in a web browser is too slow). So we are switching to Javascript for the web browsers and eBooks. This work is underway.

For most of the former applets, there will be individual javascript widgets that provide the same functionality. The standalone java applications will be maintained and available. And there may be a cloud-based web application using a RIA technology like vaadin.

One intention is to make the widgets libraries available to end Users or developers. So folk can write their own logic tutorials as web pages and have running examples in them.

Javascript widgets

The javascript widgets can run in a variety of configurations (with different menus, different menu items, different logical systems, etc.). Which configuration a running instance uses depends on how they are launched, and preferences that are either on the web pages or that the User (or Instructor) chooses. The examples shown here are mostly running Introduction and Elimination rules (Gentzen sequent calculus adapted to a friendly presentation).

Example of Proof Widget
Example of Tree Library
Example of Semantics Widget
Example of Symbolization Widget
Example of Modal Trees Widget
Example of Modal Truth Tables Widget
Example of an Examination Widget [not available yet]
Example of  Reading a Counter Example from a Tree [not available yet]
Example of Lambda Widget
Example of Endorse-Deny Applet [not available yet]

The main differences between the widgets and the application are that a) the application does everything in one, b) the application can save and open files (eg of half finished proofs), and c) the application offers printing facilities more sophisticated than the mere printing of a web page.

Examples of Applications (the Documentation will help you here)

Deriver.jar, double click on this after it has been downloaded. Your machine will probably ask you about all sorts of security matters (you'll have to make your own choices on that, but the application is digitally signed by SoftOption). On the first run it will run with default preferences; make desired changes to the preferences (under the Help Menu); save them; then, on subsequent launches, it will run to your preferences.

Application 11

Clicking on any of the links to download the application will in the first instance download what is known as a 'jnlp' file, for example 'deriver.jnlp'. That jnlp file contains preferences, for example, whether to run one logical system which has (Ax.Bx) as a well-formed-formula or a different system which might have (A(x)&B(x)) as a well-formed-formula. The jnlp file would ordinarily be executed by the 'Java Web Start' application which then downloads a Java jar file, say 'Deriver.jar' and then runs the whole thing with the preferences that it had obtained.

All that used to take place automatically and completely hidden from the User.

Not so nowadays, or likely not so nowadays. There is such a suspicion of Java, that most computers won't run it all all, or won't run it with specific agreement from the User.  So, if you want to follow this form of launching very likely you will have to by hand ask your computer to run the jnlp file (and do it with the application Java Web Start).

Alternatively you can download the Deriver.jar file directly (there is a link below) and double-clicking on that will run it (likely after asking from authorization from you). But launching it this way means that the application does not know of the preferences (e.g. which logical system to use), so it will run on the default preferences. However, you, the User, can change the preferences. Once you do that, save them, run the Deriver.jar again, it will run with your preferences.

Easy Deriver [Full configuration] This can take 60 seconds to download.

No work is being put into this at present (development focus is with the applets). So, this might be a bit rough. Some time will be given to it in the summer, perhaps May or June of 2011.

If it is not running as you would wish, try the Deriver09 below. 

The full blown application can be toned down by various commands on launch (this is shown below). But, for a simpler approach, a better option is probably just to use the Applets above rather than the downloadable application.

Easy Deriver 1 [Simplest configuration]
Easy Deriver 2
Easy Deriver 3 
Easy Deriver 4

Easy Deriver 3, running Hausman (as an example) 
Easy Deriver 4, running Copi (as an example)

Deriver.jar, double click on this after it has been downloaded. Your machine will probably ask you about all sorts of security matters (you'll have to make your own choices on that, but the application is digitally signed by SoftOption). On the first run it will run with default preferences; make desired changes to the preferences (under the Help Menu); save them; then, on subsequent launches, it will run to your preferences.

Application 09

Easy Deriver09 [Full configuration] This can take 60 seconds to download.

No work is being put into this at present (development focus is with the applets). So, this might be a bit rough. Some time will be given to it in the summer, perhaps May or June of 09.

If it is not running as you would wish, try the older one below.

Application 08

Easy Deriver08 [Full configuration] This can take 60 seconds to download.

The full blown application can be toned down by various commands on launch (this is shown below). But, for a simpler approach, a better option is probably just to use the Applets above rather than the downloadable application.

Easy Deriver08 1 [Simplest configuration]
Easy Deriver08 2
Easy Deriver08 3
Easy Deriver08 4

Easy Deriver08 3, running Hausman (as an example)
Easy Deriver08 4, running Copi (as an example)

 Application 07

Easy Deriver07 [Full configuration] Send an email if you would like this.
 

Applets 10

Some of these pages can take 30 seconds to load (depending on the speed of your connection).

You probably want to read this before looking at or downloading anything.

The applets (and the application) can run in a variety of configurations (with different menus, different menu items, different logical systems, etc.). Which configuration a running instance uses depends on how they are launched, and preferences that the User (or Instructor) chooses. The examples shown here are mostly running Introduction and Elimination rules (Gentzen sequent calculus adapted to a friendly presentation).

Example of Proof Applet
Example of Tree Applet
Example of Semantics Applet
Example of Symbolization Applet
Example of Modal Trees Applet
Example of Modal Truth Tables Applet
Example of an Examination Applet
Example of Reading a Counter Example from a Tree
Example of Lambda Applet
Example of Endorse-Deny Applet

[10/7/09] For 2010, we are making some internal changes to address the  introduction of modal and epistemic connectives, and of types. The variables, constants, functors, and predicate letters have been given subscripts to permit infinitely many of them. And there some other bits and pieces. This work will be finished by Jan 1 2010. 

[1/1/09] We're just transferring all the code and programming into the Eclipse development environment, and that gives an opportunity to make some improvements to the underlying architecture. Such a transfer takes time, maybe six months or so, and modifications always need to be evaluated. Both the old and the new versions will be available until the transfer is complete and the results tested.

Applets 09

These have now been replaced.

 

Applets [Earlier]

These have now been replaced except for in archived legacy content outside the Content Management System.